trees matter blog

  • Mon, December 29, 2014 11:09 AM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Yes, freezing temperatures actually happen in Phoenix. Temperatures below 32 degrees for a prolonged time or over several nights can freeze tree buds/blossoms, fruit, leaves, and twigs. While the trees in our Shade Tree Program are desert-adapted and can, therefore, typically withstand freezing temperatures, young saplings can be vulnerable to the cold weather especially if they haven’t gone into winter dormancy and are, therefore, still actively growing.

    The average last frost date in central Phoenix is February 7th (it’s around April 3rd for Mesa) and as we experience freezing temperatures this week, here are some tips for protecting your young as well as frost-sensitive trees from frost:

     

    The best protection is to cover your trees with a sheet, light blanket, or burlap sack.  Hardware stores sell sheets made of light, porous material specifically for frost protection but feel free to use whatever you have on hand except for anything made of plastic. Plastic traps moisture in and can damage the tree (the captured moisture can turn to frost). Also, thick blankets or covers can soak up moisture, become heavy, and press down on the tree. Ideally, you want the cover to touch the ground to retain the warmth under the cloth and around the tree (refer to the left picture and the diagram below). Although it’s recommended to not have the cover touch the leaves or branches, if you’ve ever covered a tree or plant you know that’s quite a task so just do the best you can. 

     

    Remove the cover later in the morning when there is full sunlight and preferably when temperatures are warmer.  Some of the coldest temperature occur at daybreak so if you can, wait a bit. Do not leave trees covered all day as this can damage them. 

    • If your tree gets frost bitten, do NOT trim the damaged parts as they still provide protection for the remaining living parts of the tree. Wait until the spring or when you regularly prune your tree.
    • Make sure to water your trees regularly during winter. Dehydrated trees are more susceptible to frost-- frost damage occurs when ice crystals form on the leaf surface drawing moisture from the leaf tissue so if a tree is already dehydrated, the additional dehydration damages or kills it. Wet soil also absorbs heat during the day so water your plants in the morning and do not overwater. Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Trees.
    • For large trees or frost-sensitive ones such as citrus trees, string 100-watt electric outdoor light bulbs, such as Christmas lights (pictured right). Not only are you decorating for the holidays but you are warming your trees.  Make sure the lights are not too close to the trunk or branch that it could burn it.
    • Place mulch around deciduous trees (like our Shade Trees) to prevent them from breaking winter dormancy by insulating them against fluctuating surface soil temperatures. However, do not place mulch around citrus trees, as it will hinder the capturing of heat that will protect the plant.

    Below are some great references for additional information and ideas. As always, if you have additional tips or questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://extension.arizona.edu/sites/extension.arizona.edu/files/pubs/az1002.pdf                           

    http://www.seminolecountyfl.gov/extensionservices/adults/horticulture/english/article480.aspx

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/how-to-protect-fruit-trees-from-frost-zb0z1302zsor.aspx

    http://phoenix.about.com/od/desertplantsandflowers/qt/frostplants.htm  

    http://web.idiggreenacres.com/blog/bid/324818/Cold-Sensitive-Plants-Use-Frost-Protection-Cloth-this-Winter

    http://farmerfredrant.blogspot.com/2010/12/holiday-lights-for-frost-protection.html

    http://canopy.org/caring-for-trees/protecting-trees-from-freeze/ 

     

  • Mon, December 08, 2014 11:11 AM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    This week we end our blogs series on Shade Tree Types with our final tree--the Native Mesquite.

    The Native Mesquite is popular with people who want a tree that can grow to be quite large and aren’t concerned about thorns. A local Native Mesquite pictured left shows the giant canopy of a full-grown tree. Mesquites can grow up to 30 ft tall and wide and are known for their strong root systems that help support them during strong winds and storms.  They are semi-deciduous so the trees lose some of their leaves during the winter. By mid-spring, the trees bloom into cream colored, cylindrical flowers and tan seed pods are shed in summer. A fun fact about Native Mesquites is that their pods can be ground into flour and used in many recipes.  Refer to our blog on All About Mesquite for mesquite flour recipes and to learn about the other uses of mesquite pods and how to harvest them yourself!  

     

    One important thing to note about the Native Mesquite is that the thorns can be quite  large and sharp, as pictured right, so if this is a concern you might want to consider the Thornless Hybrid Mesquite.  

    Care and Maintenance

    The Native Mesquite sapling you will receive comes in a 5-gallon base and tends to be 3-6 feet tall (pictured below). Plant your sapling in an area that receives full sun and during the first year, make sure to water the tree deeply, to 2-3 feet deep and away from the trunk to encourage the growth of a strong root system. The Native Mesquite has a natural deep root system that can grow over 100 feet laterally in order to find water, and the first 2-3 years are the most important in establishing this root system. During the spring and fall/winter, water it once every 14 days or less if there is rainfall, but during the hottest summer months increase the watering to once every week.  Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Trees for more information on watering techniques. 

    After the first year of growth, periodic thinning is the best way to prune your tree. Remove no more than 20% of the canopy during the growing season in order to encourage root development that is proportional to the shoot growth of young trees. In areas with heavy monsoons, it is important to prune before the beginning of the storm season. Additional pruning, 3 to 4 weeks later, will reduce the risk of wind-throw and branch damage. Pruning more than 20% of the canopy can impede rooting and encourage undesired re-growth of dense, top-heavy clusters of branches and leaves.

    While we typically don’t encourage staking, young trees can become top heavy and may need to be staked for a brief period (no more than the first year).  Please refer to our blog on How to Properly Stake a Tree for guidance

    Native Mesquites are fast-growing, hardy trees and widely used in desert landscaping. While the pods are edible it should also be noted that a full-grown tree can potentially shed quite a bit of them so make sure and keep this in mind when you are deciding where to plant your tree.  And remember they have thorns!

    If you have a Native Mesquite or are thinking of getting one and have questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.aridzonetrees.com/AZT%20Interactive%20Buttons/Tree%20Index/Cut%20sheets/Prosopis/Prosopis%20juliflora%20AZT.htm

    http://extension.arizona.edu/sites/extension.arizona.edu/files/pubs/az1429.pdf

    http://www.cvwd.org/conservation/lush_book/lush3_2.html

    http://www.desertusa.com/flora/mesquite-tree.html 

  • Mon, November 10, 2014 12:39 PM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Our blog series on Shade Tree Types is going to end with the Mesquite varieties we offer.  First we describe the Thornless Hybrid Mesquite.

    The Thornless Hybrid Mesquite (THM) is another favorite of people because the tree grows quickly, has a wide, lush green canopy that provides great shade, and  the tree does not have thorns. The THM can grow up to 30 ft tall and wide and is know for its strong root system that helps support it during strong winds and storms.  It is semi-deciduous so it loses some of its leaves during the winter.  In late spring, THMs produce clusters of yellow-green flowers and in summer, the tree starts to shed its brown seed pods. 

    THMs can be found throughout the valley.  Pictured left is one located near our downtown Phoenix office. You can see the full shade it provides for the front of the house as well as the driveway and how it adds immensely to the surrounding landscape. 

     


    Care and Maintenance:

    The THM sapling you will receive comes in a 5-gallon base and tends to be 3-6 feet tall (pictured right). Plant your sapling in an area that receives full sun and during the first year, make sure to water the tree deeply, to 2-3 feet deep and away from the trunk to encourage the growth of strong roots. The THM has a natural deep root system that can grow over 100 feet laterally in order to find water, and the first 2-3 years are the most important in establishing this root system. During the spring and fall/winter, water it once every 14 days or less if there is rainfall, but during the hottest summer months increase the watering to once every week.  Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Tree for more information on watering techniques.  

    After the first year of growth, prune the tree to remove about 20% of the canopy during the growing season in order to encourage root development that is proportional to the shoot growth of young trees. In areas with heavy monsoons, it is important to prune before the beginning of the storm season. Additional pruning, 3 to 4 weeks later, will lessen the risk of wind-throw and branch damage. Pruning more than 20% of the canopy can inhibit rooting and encourage undesired re-growth of dense, top-heavy clusters of branches and leaves.

    While we typically don’t encourage staking, THM can become top heavy and may need to be staked for a brief period (no more than the first year).  Please refer to our blog on How to Properly Stake a Tree for guidance.

    THMs are fast-growing, hardy trees and widely used in desert landscaping. The thornless feature is also kid-friendly. It should be noted that a full-grown tree can potentially shed quite a bit of pods so make sure and keep this in mind when you are deciding where to plant your tree.

    If you have a Thornless Hybrid Mesquite or are thinking of getting one and have questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.aridzonetrees.com/AZTimes%20Trees/Thornless%20Hybrid%20Mesquite.htm

    http://www.mswn.com/media/info_sheets/prosopis_hybrid_phoenix.pdf

    http://www.cvwd.org/conservation/lush_book/lush3_2.html

  • Mon, November 03, 2014 4:45 PM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    This week we feature the second Palo Verde given away through the Shade Tree Program--the Blue Palo Verde.

    The Blue Palo Verde (BPV) is Arizona’s state tree and one of the most colorful desert trees when in full bloom. The Arizona native tree grows quickly, reaching as high and wide (its canopy) as 30-35 feet. A local BPV near our downtown Phoenix office (pictured left) shows the ample shade it provides for driveways. Anyone who has had their car paint fade from the strong Arizona sun or been unable to touch the hot steering wheel can appreciate this.  

    The bark of a BPV is a striking bluish green and the beautiful yellow blooms (pictured  right) announce the arrival of spring in Arizona and attract beneficial pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds. The tree is highly adapted to desert conditions, withstanding extreme desert heat and cold hardy to 10 to 15 degrees. 

    Care and Maintenance: 

    The BPV sapling you will receive comes in a 5-gallon base and tends to be 3-6 feet tall (pictured left). Plant your sapling in an area that receives full sun and during the first year, make sure to water the tree deeply, at least to 3 feet. Water away from the trunk to encourage the growth of roots that have to search for water. During the spring and fall/winter, water it once every 14 days but during the summer increase the watering to once every week. Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Tree for more information on watering techniques. 

    After the first year of growth, prune the tree to reinforce the shape you want since BPVs can initially grow as large scrubs. As with the Thornless Palo Verde, do not remove more than 30% of the tree’s canopy during the summer as this can cause “sunburn” injuries on the tree which can later be infested with wood boring insects. Any insect infestation can inhibit the fast seasonal growth of young trees so inspect your tree and if you see any insects such as aphids, thrip, whiteflies, or psyllids, apply a non-harsh control measure such as those listed in our blog on aphids and organic insect control here.

    BPVs are truly beautiful trees but an important reminder is that these trees can shed quite a bit. If placed in front of a house, the blooms blanket a barren ground with golden blooms and look quite stunning. But if a BPV is placed near a pool, the shedding can become quite the headache. Also, these tree do have THORNS so if kids climbing trees is an issue, you might want to consider the Thornless Palo Verde.

    If you have a BPV or are thinking of getting one and have questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.mswn.com/plants/database/plant/parkinsonia-florida/

    http://www.cvwd.org/conservation/lush_book/lush3_2.html

    http://www.gardenguides.com/94937-desert-plants-provide-shade.html

    http://www.aridzonetrees.com/images/Cut%20sheets/ceflo05.pdf

    http://homeguides.sfgate.com/palo-verde-tree-look-like-99855.html 

  • Sun, October 26, 2014 8:41 AM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    This week we are focusing on one of the two Palo Verde varieties offered through the Shade Tree Program--the Thornless Palo Verde.

    The Thornless Palo Verde (TPV) is a hybrid with similar characteristic founds in Palo Brea, Blue, and Mexican Palo Verdes.  The semi-evergreen TPV grows a large canopy that provides ample shade, a lush green trunk, and elaborate branching patterns that remain smooth as they mature.  Pictured left is a local TPV near our downtown Phoenix office--notice the large amount of shade the tree provides against the front of the house. 

    The TPV grows slightly smaller than other varieties but still reaches up to 25 ft tall.  During spring and summer months, TPVs bloom into small yellow flowers. In addition to providing beautiful blooms, the flowers attract beneficial pollinators such as bees and hummingbirds like those in the picture on the right, also taken from a home in the local area. 

    Care and Maintenance:

    The TPV sapling you will receive comes in a 5-gallon base and tends to be 3-6 feet tall (pictured left).  Please note that young TPVs may have thorns that fall off as the tree grows. Plant your sapling in a spot that will receive full sun. During the first year, make sure to water the tree deeply, at least to 3 feet, and away from the trunk to encourage the growth of roots that have to search for water. During the spring and fall/winter, water it once every 14 days but during the summer increase the watering to once every week.  Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Tree for more information on watering techniques. 

    After the first year, perform periodic trimming as needed but do not remove more than 30% of the tree’s canopy during the summer as this can cause “sunburn” injuries on the tree which can later be infested with wood boring insects.  Any insect infestation can inhibit the fast seasonal growth of young trees so inspect your tree and if you see any insects such as aphids, thrip, whiteflies, or psyllids, apply a non-harsh control measure such as those listed in our blog on aphids and organic insect control here.

    Thornless Palo Verdes are great trees for those who love the yellow blooms of Palo Verdes but could do without the thorns or have kids that climb trees. The tree does shed its yellow blooms so the litter should be a factor when considering this tree. The litter, however, is less with the hybrid since there are fewer blooms. Once fully-grown, the TPV provides substantial shade especially for houses that have low-placed windows or open areas. If you have a TPV or are thinking of getting one and have questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

      

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.aridzonetrees.com/AZT%20Interactive%20Buttons/Tree%20Index/Cut%20sheets/Cercidium/Cercidium%20hybrid%20DM.htm

    http://www.bakernurseryaz.com/httpdocs/locally%20grown.html

    http://www.gardenguides.com/search?q=palo+verde+hybrid&filter=all

    http://www.amwua.org/plant_detail.html?recordid=14

  • Thu, October 23, 2014 12:57 PM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Following last week’s blog on the Desert Willow, we thought we’d introduce the other willow offered through the Shade Tree Program--the Willow Acacia. 

    Native to Australia, the Willow Acacia is low maintenance, thornless, and fast growing with most mature trees reaching up to 40 ft high and 20 ft wide (pictured left).  The canopy doesn’t grow as wide/rounded due to the narrow leaves nor as low as other trees so they are, therefore, good in narrower spaces.  

    Willow Acacias are evergreen, meaning they keep their green leaves year round, and during late summer to fall the trees bloom into creamy white puffball flowers (pictured right) followed by woody bean-like pods.

     

    Care and Maintenance:

    The Willow Acacia sapling you will receive comes in a 5-gallon base and tends to be 3-6 ft tall (pictured below).  Plant your sapling in a spot that will receive the full sun. During the first year, make sure to water deeply (at least 3 ft) and away from the trunk to avoid blow over during windstorms.  Deep, infrequent watering helps to develop a strong, anchoring root system.  Once the tree has become well-rooted, water it sparingly--every three to four weeks in the summer and every other month in the winter. Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Tree for more information on watering techniques.    

    Because Willow Acacias grow quickly and can develop thick canopies, thinning the canopy helps to reduce wind resistance, especially during our monsoon season.  After the first year, prune your Willow Acacia in fall or early spring to raise and thin the canopy and to remove dead or damaged limbs. Also, although we typically discourage staking because we prefer trees to develop a strong root system on their own, sometimes Willow Acacias will benefit from staking when young, as they can grow quickly and top-heavy. Please refer to our blog on How to Properly Stake Your Tree.

    Willow Acacias might be a good choice for people who have less room to work with and want a low-maintenance, low-litter and fast growing tree. If you have a Willow Acacia or are thinking of getting one and have questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

     

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.horticultureunlimited.com/landscape-plants/desert-willow.html

    http://www.mswn.com/plants/database/plant/acacia-salicina/

    http://www.azplantlady.com/2010/09/wonderful-dilemmapart-2.html   

    http://www.cvwd.org/conservation/lush_book/lush3_2.html

    http://www.gardenguides.com/search?q=willow+acacia&filter=all 

  • Mon, October 13, 2014 11:50 AM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Over the next six weeks we are introducing the types of free trees available through the Shade Tree Program by providing some background information and care requirements, in order to help you decide which trees you want for your home and to learn more about desert-adapted trees.

    This week we are starting off with the Desert Willow, as this is one of the more popular trees because of the beautiful pink and purple flower blooms (pictured below).  

     

    Desert Willows are native to the U.S. southwest and northern Mexico. Their native name, mimbre, means willow-like. Desert Willows aren’t, in fact, true willows as they below to a family of blooming plants. Desert Willows are drought-tolerant and fast-growing, with some reaching heights as tall as 25 feet.  They can be grown as a multi-stemmed shrub or pruned as a tree.

    From spring to summer, the Desert Willow blooms into white, purple, and pale pink trumpet-shaped flowers. By early fall,  the flowers are replaced by long, thin seedpods (pictured below). Medicinal teas can be made from the dried flowers, leaves and bark that help regulate glucose metabolism and sooth coughs. The wood has often been used for fence posts, houses, and thatch roofs. From late November to March, the tree drops its leaves and often customers contact us because the tree appears dead.  This behavior is completely normal as part of the dormancy process our desert-adapted trees undergo during the fall and winter (refer to our blog on Tree Dormancy for more information). 

    Care and Maintenance:

    The Desert Willow sapling you will receive comes in a 5-gallon base and tends to be 3-6 feet tall (pictured right).  Plant your sapling in a spot that will receive full sun or partial shade. During the first year, make sure to water the tree deeply--down to at least 3 feet. During spring and fall/winter, water it once approximately every 14 days but during the summer increase the watering to once every week.  Refer to our blog on How to Properly Water Your Tree for more information on watering techniques. 

    After the first year, prune the tree in spring just as leaves being to grow to remove any winter damage and to shape it. Below is a picture of one of our customer’s Desert Willow almost a year after receiving it from a workshop.  She had recently pruned it into the tree shape she wanted.  

    If you choose the Desert Willow as one (or both) of the free Shade Trees for your home, you will enjoy the beautiful blooms and although the tree does shed its blooms and pods, it is moderate compared to other desert-adapted trees.  Also, Desert Willows tend to be resistant to pests and disease. The main drawback with the tree is that it may not grow as tall and wide (its canopy) as our other trees, such as the Mesquite or Willow Acacia.    

    If you have a Desert Willow or are thinking of getting one and have questions, please post them on our Ask the Arborist forum here and our volunteer Arborist, Erik, will answer them. 

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.horticultureunlimited.com/landscape-plants/desert-willow.html

    http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CHLI2

    http://www.gardenguides.com/92697-desert-willow-trees.html

    http://desertswest.blogspot.com/2010/03/desert-willow-and-blue-skyskywatch.html

  • Mon, September 29, 2014 11:51 AM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Although temperatures are just beginning to subside in Arizona, several tree owners contacted us because their trees looked like they were dying. In most cases, the tree has gone into dormancy. We thought we’d explain winter dormancy and what you can expect your tree to do--and what you can do to see if your tree is still alive.

    Many desert-adapted trees are deciduous, meaning they lose their leaves seasonally. Trees shed their leaves because they stop producing food (photosynthesis) due to environmental changes such as cold weather, not enough light, or extreme drought. The tree remains alive by living off its store of carbohydrates in its roots. Dormancy is the tree version of hibernation, where everything slows down--metabolism, energy consumption, and growth. Leaves require energy to maintain and, therefore, are shed during dormancy. A chemical called abscisic acid is produced in terminal buds (where the stem connects to the leaf) that signals the leaf to break off and suspends tree growth. 

    Often, when customers plant their trees in the fall or when fall approaches, leaves begin to fall off or in the case of Desert Willows--one of the tree types available through the Shade Tree Program--the tree stops blooming and flowers fall off.  During the summer, desert-adapted trees such as the Desert Willow or the Willow Acacia (pictured right) are in full bloom but when the cold weather approaches, their branches look bare and dead (as pictured below).  

    A simple way to tell if your tree is still alive is to test the flexibility and color of its twigs. Supple twigs that bend easily without breaking or still have green just under the bark are likely still OK. Twigs that break or snap or are brown under the bark may be dead. If you can’t tell, wait. A living tree will begin to sprout and produce new leaves when the conditions are appropriate. A dead tree will still be dead no matter how long you wait; it won’t get any “deader.”  So when in doubt, wait for spring.

    If you are concerned about your tree or have a question, please post it on our forum under “Ask the Arborist…” and our volunteer Arborist Erik will answer it. 

     

    References:

    Erik the Arborist, on our forum:  http://vpaaz.org/STForum

    http://www.aridzonetrees.com/AZTimes%20Horticultural/Cold%20Hardiness%20of%20Desert%20Trees.htm

    http://www.horticultureunlimited.com/landscape-plants/desert-willow.html

    http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CHLI2

    http://www.gardenguides.com/92697-desert-willow-trees.html

    http://www.sciencemag.org/content/171/3966/29.abstract

    http://www.mnn.com/local-reports/illinois/local-blog/how-do-trees-get-through-the-winter

    http://desertswest.blogspot.com/2010/03/desert-willow-and-blue-skyskywatch.html

  • Mon, September 22, 2014 10:48 AM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Do you have a problem keeping your dog away from your new, young tree? Besides buying a wire tree cage (pictured below) from your local gardening or home improvement store (which can work), here are also some interesting ways to deter animal from bugging your trees:

    1.     Scatter red chili flakes, cayenne pepper, or tobacco sauce around the tree.  Dogs don’t like the smell or sneezing affect from the peppers, and the deterrents are not harmful to the tree.

    2.     Place cotton balls dipped in vinegar around the tree.  Dogs will stay clear of the pungent smell.

    3.     If you can find some pine cones, scatter them around the base of the tree.  Dogs don’t like the prickly feeling of the cones, so they should stay clear of the area.

    4.     Scatter decorative rocks around the tree. Again, Fido won’t like the feel of them on his paws.

    5.     Plant a prickly or thorny plant (or temporary place some) around the tree. When your dog loses interest in the area, you can remove the plants. 

         

    Do you know other suggestions or have things that worked for you?  Please let us know if any of these helped keep your tree dog-free!   

     

     

    Resources:

    http://dogcare.dailypuppy.com/keep-dogs-destroying-trees-bushes-1043.html

    http://www.ehow.com/how_8119742_keep-dogs-destroying-trees-bushes.html 

  • Mon, September 15, 2014 12:41 PM | Danielle Corral (Administrator)

    Ever wondered what you can do with the 5-gallon bucket that your trees come in besides throwing it away recycling it?  Continuing on VPA’s challenge to produce no waste, we have come up with 10 different ways you can reuse the bucket: 

    1.     Use it as a container to carry your recyclables to the trash 

    2.     Use it to store extra cords or Christmas lights

    3.     Decorate it and plant herbs or flowers in it

    4.     Use it as a small container garden

    5.     Use it to store mulch or extra compost

    6.     Store extra tools or random stuff in the garage

    7.     Place them over plants to protect from frost

    8.     Around Halloween time, make a Jack-O-Lantern out of it 

    9.     Store all that random stuff in your trunk in one place

    10.  You can always drop it off at the VPA office where we will re-use them!

    Hopefully we have provided some practical and creative alternatives to just recycling the 5-gallon bucket.  Let us know what you do with yours (pictures please!)

    Resources:

    http://fivegallonideas.com/

    http://homeguides.sfgate.com/reuse-fivegallon-buckets-79498.html

    http://greenliving.lovetoknow.com/Recycled_5_Gallon_Plastic_Buckets

    Check-out all the creative ideas on pinterest:

    http://www.pinterest.com/ecocathy/reuse-recycle-buckets/

    http://www.pinterest.com/muskegmike/five-gallon-bucket/

    For hard core 5-gallon reusers:

    http://sustainablog.org/2014/02/5-gallon-bucket-gardening-reuse/ 


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